Posts By: Jennifer Bly

CES 2015: Is your web content ready for IPv6?

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This week ARIN is at CES, the largest technology tradeshow of the year.  We will be reaching out to consumer electronics industry movers and shakers to educate them about the importance of deploying IPv6 on all public facing web services.  In the video below, one of the founding fathers of the Internet, Vint Cerf, explains the issue. Stop by our booth in Tech East to discuss why IPv6 needs to be at the top of your company’s technology goals for 2015. You want to be reaching the whole Internet, not just part of it.

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ARIN by the Numbers

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This year has been an exciting time for us here at ARIN, so we thought we’d take a peek at some fun numbers from 2014. Some of these you’ll probably expect – like how many IP addresses we’ve issued throughout the year, and others you probably won’t – like how many cups of coffee we’ve drunk (yes, we’re a bunch of coffee addicts). Enjoy these stats as we reflect on our year!
71,161 /24s of IPv4 blocks issued (includes end users and ISPs)
103 vacuum pots of coffee brewed
Approximately 20 ARIN Online improvements made
9,010 + calls received at the RSD Help Desk

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5,000 Reasons to Celebrate

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ARIN Membership Reaches a New High. We are glowing because we have just reached 5,000 Members! ARIN is a member-based organization, and we couldn’t have made it this far without the support and guidance of our Membership. Since our inception, you have participated in 34 Public Policy and Members Meetings, initiated and discussed over 88 community-developed policies, and cast over 21,000 votes in ARIN Elections. Thank you! When ARIN was established in 1997, we had just 100 member organizations. As the Internet expanded so did ARIN, averaging about 30 new Members each month.

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Meet your 3 ARIN Region CRISP Team Members

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If you’ve been involved in the Internet community for any length of time, then you know we can’t speak more than a couple minutes without dropping 1 or 2 (or 10) acronyms at a time. Well, here’s one more to add to the alphabet soup – the CRISP team, short for the Consolidated RIR IANA Stewardship Proposal (CRISP) team. The CRISP team was established by the five RIRs (there we go again, the Regional Internet Registries) to develop a single proposal on behalf of the numbers community for the IANA Stewardship Transition to the IANA Stewardship Transition Coordination Group (ICG).

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8 steps to get your site ready for IPv6

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Add an IPv6 address to your web server

The first step is to get your web server listening on an IPv6 address, as well as an IPv4 address. How you achieve this will depend on how your web server is managed. If you’re on a shared hosting account, you’ll be dependent on your hosting provider. If you run your own server, you’ll need to obtain an IPv6 address from your hosting provider (assuming they support IPv6), configure your server to use it and then ensure that your web server (e.g. Apache is listening on this address).

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Help ARIN Shape Our New IPv6 Campaign

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Have you ever had this conversation? You: “Hey, did you know the Internet is running out of IP address space?
Non-technical colleague: “No, really?” You: “Yeah, IPv4 is running out, and we need to make sure we are planning to support IPv6, the new IP address platform. I think enabling our website may be the best place to start.” We want to hear more about those conversations.

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ARIN 34 Members Meeting Daily Recap

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It’s hard to believe ARIN 34 is already over. Today wrapped up the final of day of our Public Policy and Members Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland. Thanks to those of you joined us onsite and remotely. Here’s a quick version of what happened during today’s meeting. This morning we began with a warm welcome to attendees, and we heard updates from the Number Resource Organization (NRO) on current activities and objectives. Then each ARIN department head shared updates; Mark Kosters discussed engineering, Susan Hamlin gave the update on Communications and Member Services, Erin Alligood spoke about Human Resources and Administration, Val Winkelman gave an update from the Financial Services Department, and Leslie Nobile spoke about Registration Services. Bill Darte and Stacy Hughes ARIN 34Advisory Council Chair, John Sweeting, gave the AC Report, thanking both Stacy Hughes and Bill Darte for their long time service on the ARIN Advisory Council.

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ARIN 34 Public Policy Meeting Daily Recap

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ARIN’s 34th Public Policy and Members Meeting arrived in the Charm City to hold an open discussion of Internet number resource policies. Lots of lively conversations ensued today, and more will follow tomorrow. In case you weren’t with us here in Baltimore, Maryland or online today, here’s a quick recap about what happened along with some info on how YOU can participate in the meeting tomorrow. We discussed a whopping 10 policies on day one of ARIN 34. At the start of the day, first time attendees got up to speed on all things ARIN with an orientation breakfast. Then we jumped right into the public policy meeting with a report on IPv6 IAB/IETF activities from the most recent Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) meeting. Next, a policy implementation and experience report reviewed current policies and provided feedback to the community. Before heading into policy discussion, the Advisory Council Chair presented on-docket proposals.

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Build Your Own IPv6 Lab

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IPv6 is called the new Internet protocol. However, it’s been running on the Internet since 1999, so it’s really not so new, it’s just that not a lot of networks have implemented it as of yet. The challenge is that it is different from what we are all used to working with. It’s a bigger number: 128 bits compared to IPv4’s 32 bits. It has colons instead of periods (ok, dots for us diehard networking folks). It has all new routing protocol components. And on, and on. But, it has WAY MORE possible addresses than IPv4! The theory is, we should never run out in our lifetimes! But, it is different. So, how do you learn about IPv6 if your company is not implementing IPv6? How do you afford the equipment that is capable of running IPv6? More importantly, should you spend your own money and time to learn about IPv6 if there are no other compelling reasons or funding? The answer: YES, you should learn it on your own! A professional technologist should realize that investing in yourself is important and generally does payoff in the future. How much are you willing to invest, money wise? How about very little (and I mean ‘little’ as in a few bucks)?

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Internet Governance Forum 2014 in Istanbul, Turkey

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Last week I had the privilege of attending the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Istanbul, Turkey to support the Number Resource Organization (NRO) on behalf of ARIN. More than 2,300 people convened in Istanbul, Turkey plus another 1,100 tuned in online to discuss Internet Governance matters with the theme “Connecting Continents for Enhanced Multistakeholder Internet Governance.” This being the first IGF I’ve attended in person, I have a few observations I’d like to share with you.

The IGF brings together varied viewpoints from around the world and from many cross sections of the Internet community; there were stakeholders representing development, regulatory, technical, economic, social, and civil society communities. These individuals, many experts in their respective fields, meet at the IGF to share and represent their interests, and this leads to many rich discussions.

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