Posts By: Jennifer Bly

What do terms like multistakeholderism, Internet governance, and technical community really mean?

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Last year I went to my first Internet Governance Forum in Bali, Indonesia. I was involved in several workshops and discussions about “the role of the technical community in Internet governance,” including the Regional Internet Registries (RIRs) and Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF); the role of governments; questions of increasing access to communications resources for the next billion users; and reactions to “pervasive monitoring” of Internet communications by US and other intelligence agencies. I’ve been involved with “Internet policy” for many years now, as a member of ARIN’s AC, on various ICANN Advisory Committees, and as a liaison to the ICANN Board of Directors…which turned out to be a useful perspective, but by no means complete!

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Live Beyond Layer 3

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I’m a layer three guy, which means that I am a network guy, specifically an Internet guy. I work on routers and connect big networks to other big networks to try and make the Internet work better. For a long time, I, and many people like me have tried very hard to ignore what we call layers 8/9/10 (the financial, administrative, and governmental entities involved with the Internet). Or worse, sometimes we have been known to sneer at them as “damage to be routed around”. I know that attitude still persists among some, but it really fails to take in the whole story.

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Sign Your DNS Zones

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Last month we signed ARIN’s forward DNS zone as part of our commitment to Domain Name System Security (DNSSEC). That means we completed the process that essentially allows resolvers to verify the arin.net information that they receive from ARIN’s nameservers, and it allows users to have a higher degree of confidence that when they go to https://www.arin.net or act on any other information under arin.net that they are communicating with the host they expect. We went through the process of signing ARIN’s forward DNS zones to do our part to contribute to a valuable and trustworthy Internet. The process can be complex, but it’s worth it.

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Why Is the Transition To IPv6 Taking So Long?

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We stand on the cusp of an explosion in the number of Internet-connected devices. The mobile revolution was just the beginning. Combined, the burgeoning wearables market and the Internet of Things will potentially create billions of new connected devices over the next few years. Every device will need an IP address and there are far too few available addresses within the IPv4 system to handle the sheer quantity of connections. It’s a problem that’s been predicted and solved for many years, in theory at least. But IPv6 is being adopted at a glacially slow pace. The reasons for the gradual adoption are simple to understand. It’s expensive. The Internet is made up of tens of millions of servers, routers, and switches that were designed to work with IPv4. Upgrading that infrastructure entails a significant capital investment.

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Caribbean Internet Governance Forum (CIGF) Celebrates 10 Years

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CTU Telecommunications Specialist, Nigel Cassimire, shares what happened at this year’s Caribbean Internet Governance forum. The 10th edition of the Caribbean Internet Governance Forum (CIGF) was held at the Atlantis, Paradise Island Resort in The Bahamas from 6th to 8th August 2014. The CIGF is a regional, multi-stakeholder forum which was initiated by the Caribbean Telecommunications Union (CTU) and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat in 2005 in order to coordinate a regional approach to Internet Governance issues for the final session of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in Tunis that year. The CIGF has since been convened annually by the CTU and lays claim to being the first such regional forum in the world, all others having been convened after the initial global Internet Governance Forum in 2006.

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Getting Serious About IPv6 – Go Big or Go Home

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I gave an Interop IPv6 presentation titled “Getting Serious About IPv6 – Go Big or Go Home” in Las Vegas on April 3, 2014. Since then, ARIN announced it has moved to Phase 4 (down to its last /8 of IPv4 – that happened on April 23, 2014). I think what surprised people the most (based on the feedback I got from the session) was that my argument about adoption for IPv6 had little to do with ARIN running out of IPv4. After all, this is what everyone talks about, that there are no more IPv4 addresses. My argument is: You have already deployed IPv6… you just didn’t know it. At this point, you may be scratching your head saying Ed is crazy, what is he talking about? Let me point out that all major OS platforms (and different flavors of those platforms) support IPv6 and have for a while now. It turns out that IPv6 is enabled (on by default) and preferred in almost all cases.

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IETF 90 Part 1

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ARIN Advisory Council member, Cathy Aronson, is at IETF 90 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada this week. Follow along as she shares her findings with us on TeamARIN! Yesterday morning I attended the IEPG (Internet Engineering and Planning Group) meeting here at IETF 90. George Michaelson of APNIC gave an interesting presentation about Teredo (a tunneling technology that allows IPv6 capable hosts to use IPv6 over a IPv4 only connection). George’s slides are here. The great thing about his presentation is that he observed Microsoft doing exactly what they said they were going to do. They turned off their Teredo relays. It is clear in George’s graphs that the Microsoft Teredo relays have been turned off. The presentations about sunsetting Teredo are linked here:

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ARIN is in the Caribbean

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See what we did there? Not only are the letters A-R-I-N actually in the word cARIbbeaN, but so much more. There are many Caribbean economies in the ARIN’s service region and we work hard to serve everyone that depends on us for Internet number resources. For those of you in the Caribbean, we have some suggestions for what you can do to prepare for the future of the Internet and to get more involved in ARIN and other important organizations in the Caribbean. Get ready for IPv6. Network operators and content providers alike need to prepare for the future Internet.

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Gearing up for IGF-USA

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It isn’t news that the Internet community is living in interesting times. Since the NTIA announced its intention to transition oversight of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community in March of this year, the debate has been fast and furious. At ICANN 50 in June the panels on the transition process and the larger issue of ICANN accountability were among the most heavily attended sessions on the agenda. While discussion in ICANN continues, we are heading into the Internet Governance Forum USA (IGF-USA) on 16 July, when thought leaders from across the US Internet community will meet at George Washington University for this full-day event, from 8:30 AM to 7:00 PM.

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IPv6 Effects on Web Performance

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There are a lot of efforts to improve the speed of the web. The inevitable release of HTTP 2.0 in the near future will address many of the existing web performance bottlenecks. Will IPv6 increase web performance in the future? The answer is Yes! IPv6 has many improvements over its v4 counterpart that will help make the web a faster place. IPv6 does not fragment packets; this means that any packet reassembly does so at the client or at some other endpoint. The router is free to use those extra CPU cycles to move packets faster through the network.

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