IPv6

IPv6 in Gotham City: Interop New York 2014

by

This week, ARIN trekked north to the wilds to Manhattan for Interop New York. Surrounded by networking gurus and cloud specialists, we were pleased, but hardly surprised, to see that IPv6 awareness has never been higher. Most passersby had already requested an IPv6 address block for testing purposes, and many were fully deploying it across their networks. Major roadblocks appear few and far between, and many organizations were simply waiting for their upstream providers to turn on IPv6 for them, or for their IPv4 allocations to run out. With nothing major getting in the way of IPv6 deployment, many eyes have turned to the dwindling pool of IPv4 remaining in the ARIN region, which, at the time of this posting, lies at a minute 0.66 /8 equivalents: down five percent from the beginning of Interop, and down nearly 50 percent since Interop Las Vegas ended in April of this year.

Read More

Build Your Own IPv6 Lab

by

IPv6 is called the new Internet protocol. However, it’s been running on the Internet since 1999, so it’s really not so new, it’s just that not a lot of networks have implemented it as of yet. The challenge is that it is different from what we are all used to working with. It’s a bigger number: 128 bits compared to IPv4’s 32 bits. It has colons instead of periods (ok, dots for us diehard networking folks). It has all new routing protocol components. And on, and on. But, it has WAY MORE possible addresses than IPv4! The theory is, we should never run out in our lifetimes! But, it is different. So, how do you learn about IPv6 if your company is not implementing IPv6? How do you afford the equipment that is capable of running IPv6? More importantly, should you spend your own money and time to learn about IPv6 if there are no other compelling reasons or funding? The answer: YES, you should learn it on your own! A professional technologist should realize that investing in yourself is important and generally does payoff in the future. How much are you willing to invest, money wise? How about very little (and I mean ‘little’ as in a few bucks)?

Read More

Why Is the Transition To IPv6 Taking So Long?

by

We stand on the cusp of an explosion in the number of Internet-connected devices. The mobile revolution was just the beginning. Combined, the burgeoning wearables market and the Internet of Things will potentially create billions of new connected devices over the next few years. Every device will need an IP address and there are far too few available addresses within the IPv4 system to handle the sheer quantity of connections. It’s a problem that’s been predicted and solved for many years, in theory at least. But IPv6 is being adopted at a glacially slow pace. The reasons for the gradual adoption are simple to understand. It’s expensive. The Internet is made up of tens of millions of servers, routers, and switches that were designed to work with IPv4. Upgrading that infrastructure entails a significant capital investment.

Read More

Getting Serious About IPv6 – Go Big or Go Home

by

I gave an Interop IPv6 presentation titled “Getting Serious About IPv6 – Go Big or Go Home” in Las Vegas on April 3, 2014. Since then, ARIN announced it has moved to Phase 4 (down to its last /8 of IPv4 – that happened on April 23, 2014). I think what surprised people the most (based on the feedback I got from the session) was that my argument about adoption for IPv6 had little to do with ARIN running out of IPv4. After all, this is what everyone talks about, that there are no more IPv4 addresses. My argument is: You have already deployed IPv6… you just didn’t know it. At this point, you may be scratching your head saying Ed is crazy, what is he talking about? Let me point out that all major OS platforms (and different flavors of those platforms) support IPv6 and have for a while now. It turns out that IPv6 is enabled (on by default) and preferred in almost all cases.

Read More

IPv6 Effects on Web Performance

by

There are a lot of efforts to improve the speed of the web. The inevitable release of HTTP 2.0 in the near future will address many of the existing web performance bottlenecks. Will IPv6 increase web performance in the future? The answer is Yes! IPv6 has many improvements over its v4 counterpart that will help make the web a faster place. IPv6 does not fragment packets; this means that any packet reassembly does so at the client or at some other endpoint. The router is free to use those extra CPU cycles to move packets faster through the network.

Read More

Just in time for summer – IPv6 is heating up

by

Just last week was the second anniversary of the World IPv6 Launch, and the Internet Society published some interesting and useful information in celebration of this milestone—everything from an infographic to IPv6 case studies. But that isn’t the only milestone event that is contributing to the rising interest in IPv6. This week we also got word from our region to the south that LACNIC reached their final /10 of IPv4 address space on Tuesday, marking the exhaustion of addresses in their region.

Read More

Top 3 reasons PR pros need to know about IPv6

by

Not a lot people outside of the technical community are aware that the Internet is undergoing one of its most important evolutions to date. To put it simply, the Internet as we know it will soon be a thing of the past. The pool of available IPv4 addresses has just about run dry and once they are gone, the old Internet will replaced by a new network based on a new protocol: IPv6. This change will have a massive impact on public relations professionals who increasingly rely on data to track campaign performance, conversions and website traffic.

Read More

IPv6 Addressing Tips

by

Ross Chandler, Principal Network Architect of IP network evolution at Eircom/Meteor, shares a few tips on working with IPv6 from his own experience. The bottom line? You can do this! The most significant changes with IPv6 are: vastly more addresses and the way the extra bits are used. Here are a few practical tips for when you’re adding IPv6 to your network and connected devices. Don’t stress about the length of IPv6 addresses.

Read More

Interop Las Vegas: Doubling Down on IPv6

by

Last week, we carved out a corner of the Interop Las Vegas expo floor for any attendees with questions about IPv4, IPv6, ARIN technical services, and so forth. To our delight, we were flooded from start to finish with all manner of organizations from across the region, and questions on nearly every topic! The biggest topic, of course, is IPv6 adoption. More organizations asked us about how to get IPv6 deployed than ever before, and with good reason.

Read More

Setting a Customer Focused Approach

by

ARIN isn’t an organization I can stay away from for long. I served a number of roles at ARIN over the course of 13 years, before moving to the Internet Society to implement new programs focused on deploying key Internet technologies. I was excited to have the opportunity to return to ARIN and lead efforts to hone our focus on the customer and improve the way we serve our community.

Read More